Gresham In The News

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  • Gresham police shoot man after woman in car screams for help

    A woman screamed for help inside a car in a Gresham neighborhood, moments before officers shot and killed a man they say was forcibly detaining her, police said. Watch video

    A woman screamed for help inside a car in a secluded Gresham neighborhood Tuesday morning, moments before officers shot and killed a man they say was forcibly detaining her, police said.

    The shooting occurred just after 3 a.m. in the 18700 block of Southeast Grant Street, but 911 calls originated about 14 blocks to the north, according to Officer John Rasmussen, a Gresham police spokesman.

    Multiple witnesses first reported seeing an ongoing assault between a man and woman at an apartment complex in the 800 block of Southeast 190th Avenue. The woman screamed for help and was forced into a car against her will, callers told police.

    Minutes later, more 911 callers reported seeing a woman screaming and banging from inside a car on Grant, a cul-de-sac that intersects with 190th, police said.

    "I don't know that they have any connection to either area," Rasmussen said when asked if the man or woman lived at either location.

    When officers arrived at Grant, they encountered the 22-year-old man in the street, where he was shot.

    Rasmussen declined to provide details about the confrontation, including whether the man was armed or why police used deadly force. He said detectives are looking for witnesses, and that releasing details could taint the search.

    "I don't know where she was in relation to him," Rasmussen said. "I have not been told what weapons he had. That's all what's being investigated."

    The woman's condition is unknown, and detectives haven't identified those at the scene, police said. The two officers directly involved in the shooting were placed on paid leave during the initial phases of the investigation, a standard practice.

    Natalie Scribner, a neighbor who lives on Southeast 189th Avenue, said she believes she heard the commotion while she was half asleep overnight.

    She didn't think much about it. She's never had to worry about safety in her neighborhood. At worst, she said, she hears drag racing Friday nights on Northwest Division Street to the south of her home.

    Police don't often visit that cluster of homes off the Grant cul-de-saq.

    "I've responded there maybe twice in 11 years," Rasmussen said.

    Detectives ask anyone who has information about the confrontation and shooting to call the Gresham Police tip line at 503-618-2719.

    -- Tony Hernandez
    thernandez@oregonian.com
    503-294-5928
    @tonyhreports

  • Portland Metro Tuesday Traffic: Various Washington County road projects slow the commute

    The Bureau of Reclamation is doing seismic testing of Scoggins Dam and will close the southbound lane of West Shore Drive at Hagg Lake May 31-July 1.


    Road projects are heating up in various parts of Washington County and commuters are having to take it slow, or choose alternate routes.

    Currently Evergreen Parkway remains closed at Cornelius Pass Road through May 30. Crews are replacing the road at the railroad tracks. Pedestrians and bikes can get through, but cars must use the detour.

    NORTHWEST PORTLAND 8:52 a.m.; Crash reported in an eastbound lane U.S. 26 near Sylvan.

    Update 8:56 a.m.; Quickly cleared.

    ***

    SOUTHEAST PORTLAND 8:13 a.m.; Lanes blocked due to a crash southbound 82nd Avenue south of Division Street.

    ***

    VANCOUVER 8:13 a.m.; Injury rollover crash Interstate 5 southbound near the Main Street overpass. Traffic quickly backing to Hazel Dell.

    Update 8:50 a.m.; Crash now moved to the right shoulder. Traffic still heavy from Hazel Dell.

    ***

    SOUTHWEST PORTLAND 7:52 a.m.; Injury crash involving a pedestrian at Southwest Barbur Boulevard and Terwilliger Road.

    ***

    INTERSTATE BRIDGE 7:42 a.m.; Disabled vehicle blocking the center lane southbound I-5 on the bridge. Traffic was already slow from an earlier crash.

    Update 7:50 a.m.; Cleared.

    ***

    LAKE OSWEGO: McVey Avenue paving 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Tuesday, May 24, from Erickson to State Street.  Partial lane closures and obey detour signs and  flaggers.

    ***

    GLADSTONE 7 a.m.; Crews heading to a crash I-205 northbound between Highway 213 and the Gladstone exit. Right shoulder blocked.

    ***

    Screen Shot 2016-05-24 at 6.34.36 AM.pngI-84 west at Lloyd Boulevard 

    I-84 WESTBOUND 6:36 a.m.; A multi-vehicle crash has the right travel lane and the right exit lane blocked on I-84 westbound at Lloyd Boulevard. Expect delays.

    Update 7:20 a.m.; CLEARED. Backup remains to I-205.

    ***

    Verboort Road remains closed through mid-July.

    The Bureau of Reclamation is doing seismic testing of Scoggins Dam and will close the southbound lane of West Shore Drive at Hagg Lake May 31-July 1. Only one-way northbound traffic will be allowed over the dam. The west side of West Shore Drive can be accessed by following Scoggins Valley Road around the lake.

    Construction on Southwest Walnut Street at Tiedeman Road heats up again this week as crews work on sidewalks and bike paths. Expect long delays during work hours.

    For more information on Washington County road work, check here.

    Check back throughout the morning for the latest commuting updates and follow us on Twitter: @trafficportland

  • Portland-area pets for adoption May 24 (photos)

    Animals currently available for adoption at local shelters.

    Big floppy dogs. Small shy kittens. Rascally rabbits. Which is perfect for your temperament, your lifestyle, your floor space?

    Finding the right pet is never easy, but across the Portland area a passel of agencies is ready to help you find the right cat, dog or other adoptable animal for your home zoo. Each week, we present a photo sampling of the animals available with information supplied by the shelter or agency putting them up for adoption.

    Find more on the pets and other adoption choices at:

    If you adopt a pet featured on OregonLive's Pets for Adoption gallery, send us an email telling us your story to susangreen@oregonian.com

  • Portland Metro Tuesday Weather: Higher temps and more sun breaks

    Currently forecasters believe Wednesday and Thursday will be mostly dry with overcast skies and chances for sprinkles or light showers mostly held to the morning hours.

    There were enough sun appearances Monday to warm the metro area to 65 degrees. Tuesday we'll see even more sun and temperatures climbing to 71 degrees under partly cloudy skies.

    The overall weather pattern this week is unsettled and hard to predict. A broad and fairly disorganized upper low dominates much of the west, including the Canadian west making it hard to see what's coming up, even in the near future.

    Currently forecasters believe Wednesday and Thursday will be mostly dry with overcast skies and chances for sprinkles or light showers mostly held to the morning hours.

    Everyone is curious about the Memorial Day weekend weather, but the jury is still out on that one. We're not likely to have warm, fun, beach weather, but it's not certain it will be a wash out either. Stay tuned.

    The Pacific Northwest doesn't get a lot of very active thunderstorms compared to some other parts of the country. But the National Weather Service would like to dispel some myths about lightening safety for when you are caught in a storm.

    Here are a few tips from the website that offers facts about some common misconceptions:

    Myth: If it's not raining or there aren't clouds overhead, you're safe from lightning.
    Fact: Lightning often strikes more than three miles from the center of the thunderstorm, far outside the rain or thunderstorm cloud. "Bolts from the blue" can strike 10-15 miles from the thunderstorm.

    Myth: Rubber tires on a car protect you from lightning by insulating you from the ground.
    Fact: Most cars are safe from lightning, but it is the metal roof and metal sides that protect you, NOT the rubber tires. Remember, convertibles, motorcycles, bicycles, open-shelled outdoor recreational vehicles and cars with fiberglass shells offer no protection from lightning. When lightning strikes a vehicle, it goes through the metal frame into the ground. Don't lean on doors during a thunderstorm.

  • Man shot and killed by Gresham police in early morning encounter

    Police received multiple calls about an "active domestic violence sitiuation" unfolding outside, said Officer John Rasmussen. Watch video

    Update: Gresham police shoot man after woman in car screams for help

    Gresham police fatally shot a 22-year-old man in an early morning encounter Tuesday near Southeast 189th Avenue and Grant Street, a police spokesman said.

    Police received multiple calls about an "active domestic violence sitiuation" unfolding outside, Officer John Rasmussen said.

    He said officers "ended up confronting" the man involved. The man was shot and killed; Rasmussen said the man, who was not identified by police, was pronounced dead at the scene.

    Rasmussen did not know if the man was armed or how many police were at the scene when shots were fired.

    Rasmussen said "lots of people" called authorities about the initial dispute between the man and a woman. He said he did not know where the argument originated but that "it was unfolding out and about" by the time police arrived.

    Natalie Scribner, a neighbor to the south of the home, said she believes she heard the commotion while she was half asleep overnight.

    She didn't think much about it. She's never had to worry about safety in her neighborhood. At worst, she said she hears drag racing on Friday nights on Northwest Division Street to the south of her home.

    She learned about the shooting as she tried to head to work at a downtown law office after 6 a.m. but was blocked in while investigators review the scene. 

    Rasmussen said multiple police agencies are involved in the investigation.

    He said streets would remain closed as police investigate but those closures won't affect commuters.

    -- Noelle Crombie

    ncrombie@oregonian.com

    503-276-7184; @noellecrombie

    -- Tony Hernandez of The Oregonian/OregonLive staff contributed to this report.

  • Portland Metro Monday Traffic: U.S. 26 closed near Banks for serious crash

    A new closure begins Monday in North Portland. The viaduct replacement project requires a lane closure, and a detour on North Willamette Boulevard near North Chase Street.


    We have a few openings, and some closings to report for Monday.

    TriMet reports the current First Avenue construction project is complete and MAX trains will resume moving through downtown Portland with no detours or shuttles. Commuters did a pretty good job of avoiding the MAX lines during construction and now have to get used to the same old grind. You know, until the next construction project.

    NORTHEAST PORTLAND 8:34 a.m.; Crash reported on Northeast 96th Avenue and Sandy Boulevard.

    ***

    TIGARD 8:18 a.m.; Crash reported on Southwest Beef Bend Road at 150th Avenue.

    ***

    NORTHEAST PORTLAND 8:12 a.m.; Police, fire and medical to Northeast 57 Avenue at Fremont Street for a crash involving a car and pedestrian. Lanes blocked, expect delays.

    ***

    OREGON CITY 8:03 a.m.; Injury crash is blocking Highway 99E (Mcloughlin Boulevard) near Main Street in Oregon City.

    Update 8:32 a.m.; Cleared.

    ***

    EAST VANCOUVER 7:21 a.m.; Left lane blocked for a crash SR 14 westbound before the I-205 exit. 

    ***

    BANKS 6:56 a.m.; Major injury crash reported near the intersection of U.S. 26 westbound and Highway 47 involving an auto and a logging truck.

    Update 7:02 a.m. U.S. 26 is closed in both directions at milepost 49. Oregon State Police are investigating.

    Update 8:25 a.m.; Detour information: Large trucks must use OR 6 towards Tillamook. Light vehicles can use Sells Road. CLOSURE EXPECTED TO REMAIN THROUGH 10 A.M.

    ***

    Screen Shot 2016-05-23 at 7.00.59 AM.png99W in Tigard at 217 

    TIGARD 6:52 a.m.; Injury crash reported on Highway 99W northbound near the intersection with Highway 217.

    Update 8:15 a.m.; Cleared.

    ***

    BEAVERTON 7 a.m.; Police are conduction a pedestrian safety detail from 7 a.m.-10 p.m. Monday focusing on drivers who do not stop for pedestrians in a crosswalk. Detail at Southwest Fourth and Watson avenues.

    ***

    Also both the Sellwood and Hawthorne bridges are open again after construction work this weekend. Feel free to cross the river.

    A new closure begins Monday in North Portland. The viaduct replacement project requires a lane closure, and a detour on North Willamette Boulevard near North Chase Street.  The north westbound lane of North Willamette Boulevard will be closed to motor vehicle traffic, all hours, all days for about two months.

    And finally, the Interstate 5 Kuebler Street exit southbound in Salem will remain closed until May 27. The closure was extended due to weather delays.

    Check back throughout the morning for the latest commuting updates and follow us on Twitter: @trafficportland

  • Portland Metro Monday Weather: Low pressure rules the day with clouds and afternoon sun breaks

    Some cloud breaks later in the day Monday will help our high temperature to reach 62 - still a bit cooler than the average temp for this time of year.

    Monday's weather will mirror much of what we saw Sunday offering plenty of cloud cover, the occasional shower, and cool temperatures.

    A broad area of low pressure will rock in and out around our area for much of the week and will continue to drop southward today and into California tonight and tomorrow. The best threat of showers will be near the coast and coastal mountain this morning, then transition south this afternoon.

    Some cloud breaks later in the day Monday will help our high temperature to reach 62 - still a bit cooler than the average temp for this time of year.

    Tuesday promises fewer clouds and more sun breaks will warm our temperature to near 70. Tuesday might be the warmest day of the week and more unsettled weather will move in by Wednesday and and offer overcast skies and light showers through Friday.

  • Portland Metro Friday Traffic: Several bridges over the Willamette close to vehicles this weekend

    The top deck (northbound lanes) of the I-5 Marquam Bridge closes Friday night, May 20 beginning at 9 p.m. for maintenance. The closure should last through 5 a.m. Saturday, May 21.


    Significant closures of main bridges over the Willamette in Portland are happening this weekend. Both the Hawthorne and Sellwood bridges will close to motor vehicle traffic and the Interstate 5, Marquam Bridge northbound closes overnight Friday.

    HILLSBORO 8:48 a.m.; Injury crash reported on Northwest Cornell Road and 206th Avenue.

    ***

    SALEM 8:11 a.m.; The closure of the Kuebler I-5 southbound on ramp has been extended five days until 6 a.m. on Friday, May 27 because of inclement weather.

    ***

    OREGON CITY 8:08 a.m.; Crash in the right lane I-205 southbound on the Abernathy Bridge. Traffic backing to Gladstone.

    Update 8:12 a.m.; Quickly cleared to right shoulder.

    ***

    GRESHAM 8:05 a.m.; Pedestrian struck at Southeast 182nd Avenue and Division Street.

    ***

    TRIMET BUS LINES 7:57 a.m.; TriMet reports lines 17, 19 and 70 delayed up to 15 minutes through 9 a.m. due to traffic congestion caused by the Sellwood Bridge closure.

    ***

    HILLSBORO 7:29 a.m.; Crash reported on Northwest Cornell Road and Alocleck Drive on the detour marked for the Evergreen Parkway construction closure.

    ***

    NORTH PORTLAND 6:45 a.m.; A crash involving a semi has North Willamette Boulevard CLOSED at N. Olin Avenue near the University of Portland.

    ***

    Screen Shot 2016-05-20 at 6.23.22 AM.pngI-84 at 82nd Ave. 

    I-84 WESTBOUND 6:26 a.m.; Early morning crash blocks the left lane of I-84 westbound near 82nd Avenue.

    Update 7:10 a.m.; CLEARED

    ***

    The Sellwood Bridge is closed as of 6 a.m. Friday, May 20 through 6 a.m. Saturday, May 21 for girder installation. The closure applies to all traffic, including bikes and pedestrians.

    The Hawthorne Bridge is closed to motor vehicle traffic only from 7 a.m.-7 p.m. Saturday-Sunday, May 21-22 for cable replacement. Only the south sidewalk will be open to bikes and pedestrians.

    Expect the Ross Island Bridge to take the brunt of these closures and be heavily used all weekend.

    And finally the top deck, northbound lanes of the I-5 Marquam Bridge will close Friday night beginning at 9 p.m. for maintenance. The closure should last through 5 a.m. Saturday, May 21.

    Traffic northbound on I-5 will be diverted onto northbound Interstate 405 and connect with northbound I-5 at the Fremont Bridge. Traffic bound for I-84 eastbound will take I-5 south at the end of the Fremont Bridge and connect with I-84 there.

    Check back throughout the morning for the latest commuting updates and follow us on Twitter: @trafficportland

  • Portland Metro Friday Weather: Fewer clouds and less rain with a high of 70

    Most of the shower activity Friday will confine itself to the Cascades and Cascade foothills. With enough sun breaks our high temperature should hit 70 degrees.

    Low pressure and a weak core of unsettled weather is rocking in an out of our area for the next few days.

    Friday we'll see fewer clouds than on Thursday and almost no rain. Most of the shower activity will confine itself to the Cascades and Cascade foothills. With enough sun breaks our high temperature should hit 70 degrees. If the clouds are very slow to move out, we might only see 68.

    Saturday and Sunday continue the rocking pattern with some clearing periods, followed by shots of rain or showers. Expect most of the shower activity Saturday in the late afternoon and evening. Sunday looks rainy as well and each day has a forecast high of 62.

    Forecasters expect this unsettled pattern to continue through early next week. Expect chances of rain through Tuesday.

  • Grandfather regrets lending daughter his gun: 'I cry every day' over grandson's death

    A Multnomah County judge rejects bail for Dianne Davidoff, who is accused of murder in the fatal shooting of her 17-year-old son, Jacob Davidoff.

    Less than a minute after Dianne Davidoff fired a single bullet into her 17-year-old son's heart, her mother had arrived at the home to retrieve the gun.

    Marjorie and Edwin Trimpler had talked about their daughter's deteriorating mental health and decided that evening to take back the gun Edwin Trimpler had lent Davidoff a few months earlier for protection.

    In hindsight, Edwin Trimpler said Thursday, he never should have given her the weapon.

    "It's the worst thing I've ever experienced in my life," Trimpler said of the Sept. 24, 2015, shooting death of his grandson, Jacob. "...I cry over it every day."

    Trimpler spoke during the second day of a pretrial hearing in Multnomah County Circuit Court where a judge was to decide whether to allow Davidoff, 43, out of jail pending her murder trial. Defense attorneys called upon Davidoff's 66-year-old father and 21-year-old daughter to support their argument that their client was suffering hallucinations and not thinking clearly when she shot and killed her son.

    Edwin Trimpler testified that he had not recognized his daughter's deteriorating mental health when he lent her the Ruger SP101 .38-caliber handgun in early summer. Trimpler said his daughter explained that people might be out to hurt her because she'd reported to the FBI that someone had embezzled more than $1 million from the orthodontists' office where she worked.

    Trimpler said his daughter was afraid of intruders, so she repeatedly asked him to come over and search her home. Once she claimed two men in black suits were outside her house, but when Trimpler arrived, he saw no one.

    He said his daughter also was afraid to leave her house without him or her mother by her side.

    "She was staying up at night, she wasn't eating properly and there was a lot of anxiety about things," Edwin Trimpler said. "She spent a lot of time at home researching things at the computer."

    But Trimpler said his daughter's worries seemed credible, because he once dropped her off at FBI offices, where she said she was sharing information about the embezzlement scheme. He said his wife also was out shopping one day with Davidoff when they saw the same man twice and thought he was following them. They called police.

    "And it seemed believable," Edwin Trimpler said. "My wife was really upset."

    A few weeks before the killing, Dianne Davidoff cocked the gun because she was frightened about something, then accidentally fired a round at the kitchen cabinets even though she didn't intend to, Trimpler said. He said he once again instructed her what to do after cocking it if she didn't want to fire.

    "I explained to her how to decock it by gently pulling the trigger down and letting the hammer down," Trimpler said.

    Trimpler said he and his wife decided it was time to take the gun from her on Sept. 24, 2015, the day they helped Davidoff pack up her belongings to move out of the home she could no longer afford.

    Edwin Trimpler said his daughter was upset, whispering to herself, moving her eyes rapidly and talking incoherently. He said she didn't recognize her brother-in-law who had come to help her move: She was scared and wanted him out of the house.

    "She thought (he) was a wolf," Trimpler said. "He had a wolf T-shirt on. He has a big beard and long hair."

    After that, Trimpler said his wife returned to Davidoff's house shortly after 7:30 p.m., but it was too late. Marjorie Trimpler discovered her grandson on the floor with a bullet wound in his back.

    Katelyn Davidoff testified that she noticed her mother seemed stressed and wasn't showering. She also worried that Dianne Davidoff might hurt herself but said she never feared for herself or her brother.

    "I was concerned because she wasn't taking care of herself," Katelyn Davidoff said. "...It was completely out of character. My mom was always put together. She didn't leave the house without being fully dressed up with her hair done and her makeup."

    Katelyn Davidoff said she moved out a few years earlier, when she was 17, but visited her mom periodically. She said she knew her mother was smoking marijuana and had a gun. But she didn't try to remove the gun.

    "I didn't think it was my place to do," she said.

    Defense attorneys also played video of Dianne Davidoff's time in an interrogation room at the Gresham Police Department, a few hours after the killing. While waiting for detectives, Davidoff can be seen wrapped in a blanket, sitting in her 65-year-old mother's lap, as her mother rocks her back and forth.

    "You're such a good mommy," Davidoff said, crying.

    A while later, detectives started an interview by asking her one question: What happened? Davidoff, who is sobbing and speaking in a high-pitched voice, rambles on about the Catholic religion, Disney movies, Ariel the mermaid and her mother-in-law who she thinks is evil.

    "I can't even speak straight," Davidoff said. "I don't know what I'm talking about."

    Defense attorneys have conceded that Davidoff killed her son. But they plan to argue at trial that Davidoff isn't guilty of murder -- which Oregon law defines as an "intentional" killing and requires a prison term of life with a 25-year minimum. If jurors find that argument credible, they might determine that criminally negligent homicide or manslaughter is a more appropriate charge. Those crimes garner prison sentences ranging from 1 1/3 years to 10 years.

    During arguments on the motion to set bail Thursday, prosecutor Amanda Nadell said it's impossible to know what Davidoff was thinking when she pulled the trigger. But she did bring the gun into her son's bedroom, pull it out of its fanny pack, take aim and fire it -- all actions that require intent.

    Nadell also referenced one of the text messages Davidoff sent her estranged husband moments before the shooting that called him and his spawn evil. "Of course, one of his spawn is Jacob Davidoff," Nadell said.

    Defense attorney Martha Spinhirne told the judge that Davidoff might have cocked the gun while startled by some delusion -- then tried to decock it, only to accidentally fire it just like she did when she shot the kitchen cabinets.

    Spinhirne said the fact that Davidoff fired the gun once is evidence that it was an accident. Davidoff told her mother and officers who arrived moments later that, "The gun went off." She also asked, "Why did I hurt my baby? Why did I hurt my Jakey?"

    In making her decision on whether to allow Davidoff to post bail, Judge Karin Immergut noted that "the defense has done an excellent job of ...calling into question whether [Davidoff] actually had the intention of harming her own child."

    But the judge ultimately denied the request because the "proof is evident or the presumption is strong" that Davidoff intended to shoot the gun.

    "The gun had to be removed from the fanny pack holster, which takes some thought process," Immergut said. "...The gun does take effort to shoot. Ms. Davidoff was trained to in shooting not only that gun but had some knowledge of firearms."

    A trial date has not yet been set.

    -- Aimee Green

    agreen@oregonian.com

    503-294-5119

    o_aimee

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