Gresham In The News

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  • Gresham residents face potential 6.5 percent utility bill increase in 2015

    A typical Gresham household would see its bimonthly utility bills increase by another $9 next year under a staff proposal that would allow the city to maintain its system.

    A typical Gresham household would see its bimonthly utility bills increase by another $9 next year under a staff proposal that would allow the city to maintain its system.

    The suggested 6.5 percent increase for 2015, presented during a Gresham City Council work session Tuesday, would be followed by slightly smaller rate hikes in each of the subsequent two years. By 2017, the proposed increases would set the average homeowner back an additional $158 during the course of a full year, compared to today's combined costs for city drinking water, wastewater and stormwater services.

    Rates would increase by the same percentage for business customers, and actual costs would depend on water usage.

    The council could vote on the staff recommendation as early as Sept. 2. If approved, new rates likely would go into effect in January.

                                                    Difficult timing

    The city has not increased utility fees in three years, but this proposal comes just five weeks after the council voted to extend a $7.50 monthly charge. That fee continues to be tacked to those same utility bills to pay for a portion of the city's police, fire and parks maintenance budgets after voters defeated a public safety levy in May.

    "The timing is just really horrible," council member Jerry Hinton said. "I think we'll get a lot of blowback from our citizens."

    Steve Fancher, director of Gresham's Department of Environmental Services, said the city determined that delaying the increases would push future rates up by 7 percent to 8 percent a year.

    "You can't kick the can down the road, so to speak," council member Kirk French said.

    Gresham has some of the lower utility rates around the Portland area.

    Even with three years of increasing rates, an average residential customer would pay the equivalent of $82.54 per month by 2017. (Gresham residents pay their utility bills bimonthly.) That monthly cost is close to the average for what Fancher said typical homeowners already pay for the same service in neighboring cities. Many of those municipal utilities also are increasing rates, he added.

                                                    Maintenance needs

    Gresham needs the additional money to maintain a system that includes thousands of miles of aging pipes and other infrastructure, Fancher said.

    New funding would help maintain separate systems that deliver fresh drinking water and take away and treat wastewater from homes and businesses, as well as those that handle stormwater. Some pipes now in use date back as far to the 1940s or earlier and are in a dire state, while a larger number installed during a 1970s housing boom are approaching the end of their typical lifespan, Fancher said.

    Gresham is a major customer of the city of Portland's Bull Run water supply, and Fancher expects the cost of that water to rise along with other costs of doing business.

    Overall, the city will slightly reduce its annual spending on capital projects, but included in the proposed rate increase are the costs of upgrading some pipes to boost water pressure for fire protection, improving an inadequate water line along Division Street that feeds a major industrial park, starting a program to help maintain private stormwater ponds and developing future wells to supplement or replace water purchased from Portland.

    Gresham already is planning a second well that would help staunch costly purchases of Bull Run water during peak demand. That well could be pumping drinking water in about five years, and the city could sink as many as six additional wells within 20 years, Fancher said.

                                                    Staff cuts

    Recently, Fancher reorganized his staff to include cutting three management positions, which resulted in two layoffs and elimination of a vacant position. The cuts saved about $400,000 a year and helped hold down rate increases, Fancher said.

    "I don't think we can make further reductions on the personnel said," he added.

    The layoffs were particularly tough for some neighborhood advocates like Carol Rulla, president of the Coalition of Gresham Neighborhood Associations. She especially fears the layoff of watershed manager Jennifer Belknap Williamson will slow progress being made to address long-neglected stormwater retention ponds.

    "Jennifer's loss is something that is very disappointing to us," Rulla told the council.

    "It's hard to see good people go," Council President Lori Stegmann said. "We have a responsibility to our citizens and ratepayers to do the best job we can" while keeping services affordable.

    -- Eric Apalategui

  • 101 years of Portland City Council members and city annexations, in one map (interactive)

    Since 1913, 49 politicians have been elected to the Portland City Council. More than half lived within a seven-mile corridor.

    It began in 1913 with the election of Portland's political forefathers.

    The legacy continues today with Commissioner Nick Fish.

    Broken Promises

    Portland power: The Series
    » Limited voting rights
    » Geography of campaign donors
    » The city that never happened
    » Changing the political system
    » Neighborhood inactivism
    » Read the series, then come back Aug. 4 for a live chat with Brad Schmidt on Broken Promises. If you can't make it, leave your questions in the comments section below and we’ll answer them.

    Follow The Oregonian’s series on the future of east Portland, looking closely at promises not kept.

    But we need your help. Do you live, work, study or own property east of 82nd Avenue? Tell us your story.

    More than half of the 49 members to serve on the Portland City Council in the past 101 years have been elected while living in a select few neighborhoods on Portland's central eastside – the same area that Mayor H.R. Albee in 1913 and, now, Fish call home.

    That's one of the key findings demonstrated in the graphic shown above.

    Portland is one of only two large cities nationally without some form of district representation.

    As a result, political power historically has been concentrated within a 7-square-mile corridor bounded by Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, Northeast Alberta Street, 47th Avenue, and Southeast Hawthorne Boulevard.

    The political power axis resides far from east Portland and its neighborhoods beyond 82nd Avenue, now home to more than one quarter of the city's population.

    Just one politician from east Portland, Randy Leonard, has been elected to the Portland City Council in the three decades since annexation of the area began.

    The map we've compiled shows where commissioners lived when first elected; some moved.

    You can view the city's evolving boundaries and council membership over the century by hitting the "play" button at far right. Pause when you wish. Click on any year you wish to jump back or forward in time.

    You can also click on dots to see commissioners' names, or click on a commissioner's name from the list to see where he or she lived.

    To learn more about how Portland's power structure and other factors conspire to make east Portland less relevant to politicians, read The Oregonian's latest installment of the "Broken Promises" series.

     
  • Planned radio tower that spawned Gresham-Portland dispute gets smaller, but Gresham Butte neighbors still leery

    A proposed emergency communications tower atop Gresham Butte has shrunk by half, improving the view from the city below, but residents on the hill still haven't put out the welcome mat for their potential neighbor.

    A proposed emergency communications tower atop Gresham Butte has shrunk by half, improving the view from the city below, but residents on the hill still haven't put out the welcome mat for their potential neighbor.

    The tower is sought by the city of Portland, which is leading a $40 million technology upgrade to make police and fire radios work better throughout Multnomah County. The need for efficient communications was spotlighted in June as police responded to the recent school shooting in Troutdale.

    When first proposed in 2013, Portland's plan called for a 180-foot tower, later lowered to 140 feet, either of which would have pierced the skyline over the butte.

    Greshamites love their buttes, especially this one looming over downtown, and Mayor Shane Bemis led a fight against the towering structure studded with microwave dishes.

    Portland officials relented after a tense standoff. On Thursday night, they shared with Gresham residents a revised plan to build a 68-foot tower with up to two microwave dishes and antennas sticking up slightly higher on land Portland already owns near the top of the butte, also known as Walters Hill.

    Bemis was not immediately available for his opinion on the shorter tower, but some of the tower's neighbors already have weighed in against it.

    Glenn Davidson, who lives next to Portland's property, believes the lower tower is likely to be more acceptable to many Gresham residents, but they still worry that the facility will attract unwanted visitors and too much maintenance traffic.

    "You're going to have people going up and down that road at all times," said his wife, Sandy Davidson, who also has concerns whether microwaves pose health hazards. "People just come up to see what it is."

    "I would like to see them select a different place to put their tower," said Sidney Stickel, another adjoining neighbor.

    Portland officials requested the meeting with members of the Gresham Butte Neighborhood Association and other residents to get feedback before filing a formal application with city planners.

    Boom from 3rd&Main.JPGView full sizeThe boom was less visible in this photo taken from downtown Gresham.  

    To simulate the visibility of the shorter tower, Portland staff parked a boom truck on the tower site and raised its bucket to about 70 feet. They attached a 6-foot cardboard cutout the size of a microwave dish. Photos of the simulation from the city below show the fake dish and boom arm can be seen with a close look along the tree line, but they don't jut far into the sky the way a taller tower would.

    Portland already operates a radio facility at the site, including a 61-foot wooden utility pole with taller antennas that would be replaced with a lattice-structured metal tower. A house-sized service building would replace a small building on the property, said Jeff Baer, a Portland program manager who explained the revised plan to residents.

    Baer said multiple reviews have shown that Gresham Butte is vital to developing an emergency communications system that reaches more of Multnomah County.

    In order to shrink the proposed tower, Portland officials said the Gresham Butte location won't be able to send and receive signals directly from the area's main 9-1-1 center near Portland's Kelly Butte, as originally planned. The signals would require a clear path that a shorter tower won't allow.

    The tower will communicate instead with similar facilities across the Columbia River in Camas and Washougal, Wash., that in turn connect with a system of towers in high spots across the metropolitan area. Tree growth could interfere with signals within 15 years, Baer acknowledged.

    The shorter tower loses some valued "redundancy" by not being able to communicate directly with more locations in the event some are lost to a wide-ranging catastrophe, but it still will improve coverage in East County, where buttes and river gorges block radio signals.

    The switch to digital technology using microwave transmission also will increase the system's capacity to handle more radio traffic, said Mark Tanner, Portland's project leader for the upgrade.

    For example, when police agencies from across the region responded to Reynolds High School on June 10 for the shooting, officers reported at least eight instances that their emergency radios wouldn't work because the call volume was too high for the aging Gresham Butte tower to handle, he said.

    Losing communications "scares the daylights out of any firefighter or any police officer, as you might expect," said Tanner, a former police officer. "The capacity of that site is a very important thing."

    The Portland project's team has a pre-application meeting with Gresham planners on July 30 and then will meet again with neighbors and other interested parties a few weeks later. A formal application would follow, kicking off another public comment period.

    Mads Ledet, president of the neighborhood association, said neighbors want a reliable emergency communications system but intend to keep pressing Portland to prove to their satisfaction that a tower on Gresham Butte is necessary.

    --Eric Apalategui

  • Gresham-area crash kills driver, injures passenger when car hits utility pole

    The car, a 1994 black Mitsubishi 3000GT, was traveling westbound in the 30300 block of Southeast Lusted Road near Gresham when it crossed the eastbound lane, struck and broke the pole, then came to rest 40 feet away in a ditch, the Multnomah County Sheriff's Office said. No identification was immediately available.

    A crash killed a man and left a passenger seriously injured late Saturday night when a car left an east Multnomah County road and struck a utility pole.

    The car, a 1994 black Mitsubishi 3000GT, was traveling westbound in the 30300 block of Southeast Lusted Road near Gresham when it crossed the eastbound lane, struck and broke the pole, then came to rest 40 feet away in a ditch, the Multnomah County Sheriff's Office said.

    The driver was declared dead, and the passenger was taken to the hospital for treatment of injuries not considered life threatening. Officials haven't identified either person.

    The Sheriff's Office said speed and alcohol may have been involved.

    -- Andre Meunier

  • Olivia Decklar: Journalism helps student find her place at a new school

    The turning point for Olivia came when she joined the student newspaper her freshman year at Gresham High School.

    Olivia Decklar remembers the day vividly. At 13, she had just arrived home from school and walked inside the house, closing the door on the windy weather. Her mom was on the computer, looking at the house she'd decided to move to.

    Olivia was sad and angry and in disbelief. She'd be starting over at Clear Creek Middle School in Gresham.

    At her new school, she felt a like a stranger wandering the halls, with everyone socializing except her. Going from class to class, Olivia struggled to make new friends and longed for her best friends, Mandy and Miranda Deitering, twin sisters Olivia had been friends with since third grade. 

    "It felt like a sudden wave of being alone that I wasn't ready for," she said.

    The turning point came a year later, when she joined the student newspaper her freshman year at Gresham High School. Her involvement with The Gresham Argus helped Olivia meet new people, regain her confidence and overcome her shyness.

    "[Journalism made it] easier for me to make friends because I had, like, a reason to talk to them," she said. "[Reporting] made it easier to at least say 'hi.'"

    About the reporters
    This story was written by student journalists participating in The Oregonian's High School Journalism Institute, a collaborative effort with Oregon State University to promote diversity in newsrooms of the future.
    To see more of the students' work, visit the Teens blog.

    Olivia's first interview for The Argus was with Gresham's principal. She remembers entering his office, smelling his Jimmy John's sandwich, and asking questions nervously and quickly. She felt uncomfortable with the silences and was afraid to make mistakes or to ask the principal to repeat himself.

    Her second interview was with a student. For that conversation, she remembered to talk more slowly and ask more direct questions. She had already improved and was anxious to keep honing her reporting skills.

    When Olivia is reporting, she tries to put herself into  other people's stories, taking a break from her own. 

    Heading into her senior year, Olivia will be the editor-in-chief of The Argus, a dream of hers since ninth grade.

    In the future Olivia wants to attend Syracuse University in New York to study journalism. Olivia feels like she can change the world with words and put smiles on faces through her stories.

    Olivia ultimately wants to be a reporter for The New York Times, but she knows it will take confidence.

    "Confidence is key," she said.

    --Austin Thongvivong

  • Ariadna Falcon: Reynolds High youth counselor pays it forward

    Ariadna served as a counselor at Outdoor School and discovered her passion for helping youth.

    If you asked Ariadna Falcon to describe the aroma of eight sixth-grade girls crowded together in a cabin, her crinkled nose would say all you need to know.  But the "musky" stench was a small price to pay for the emotional bonding and growth that took place under her watchful eye as an Outdoor School counselor last fall.

    One student, a girl who is transgender, sat at the plastic, rectangular tables in the dining hall on the last day of camp, talking about what it felt like to be included. Ariadna said, "No one has ever made [this student] feel so accepted."

    Last school year was the first time she served as a counselor at Outdoor School, where she discovered her passion for helping youth. 

    Ariadna, 16, proudly boasts a 3.87 GPA and is involved in the Latino Club and Key Club at Reynolds High School, where she will be a junior. She has used the positive influences around her to stand up for herself and others.  

    Ariadna came to the United States from Cuba at 6, and said she had quickly adjusted to American culture. She smiled as she remembered her family get-togethers at her grandmother's house in Cuba. She said family has always been an important part of her life.

    She attended Roseway Heights, a K-8 school in Portland formerly known as Rose City Park Elementary School. In this predominantly white environment, children bullied her for her accent, and her grades were poor.  

    Ariadna Falcon GonzalezView full sizeAriadna Falcon Gonzalez

    "I felt stupid in class because I couldn't understand anything," Ariadna said. 

    But by the time fifth grade rolled around, she had learned English and continued to brush off bullies with ease. Once during fourth grade, she saw a classmate being harassed by two boys and came to the girl's defense. 

    Her mother and teachers all saw her potential and never let her settle for mediocrity. She remembers a time she fought with another girl and secretly knew she was out of line; her mother told Ariadna that she was in the wrong. Once, in a photography class, she handed in a mediocre essay and her teacher, Alice Hutchinson, refused to accept it, knowing it wasn't Ariadna's best work. 

    Hutchinson said, "What distinguishes Ariadna from other talented writers is her enthusiasm to get the job done."

    That enthusiasm transfers into every aspect of her life; if Ariadna sees injustice, she said, "I'm going to speak up. I would respectfully disagree." 

    Throughout high school, Ariadna struggled to find her place, trying different sports like track and volleyball, never quite finding her niche. 

    About the reporters
    This story was written by student journalists participating in The Oregonian's High School Journalism Institute, a collaborative effort with Oregon State University to promote diversity in newsrooms of the future.
    To see more of the students' work, visit the Teens blog.

    "I felt like I had no purpose," she said.  

    She fondly remembered her own Outdoor School experience, though, and decided to become a counselor. 

    During her week at camp, she saw a previously standoffish student jump to the rescue when a cabin mate fell ill. She watched a group of students from diverse backgrounds come together despite their differences. She witnessed her cabin mates accept a trans peer with open arms. Ariadna decided that she wanted the feeling that she got from helping children to continue for her whole life.

    Her calling, she said, is in the field of social work, because "I want to help people grow as humans."

    --Bella Trent, Madison High School
  • Andrew Nguy: David Douglas teen aims to use education to elevate students

    Andrew believes all students should have an equal chance to use their education and stop a cycle of poverty.

    The David Douglas Science Bowl team members were exhausted as they headed to the University of Portland for a February tournament at 5 a.m., but they were excited to show the other schools what they could do.

    After devouring doughnuts, hot chocolate and coffee to keep them on their toes, Andrew Nguy, the president of the team, and his teammates were pumped up to beat their competition. At David Douglas High School in Portland, they were the best of the best – and believed they were prepared for a challenge.

    But after a few rounds against Westview High School's team, Andrew was shocked at how quickly his team fell behind.

    Toward the halfway mark, David Douglas' team of seniors was losing by more than 50 points to Westview's team of freshmen. It was catching up during the second section, but it wasn't enough.

    Andrew and his teammates went from being fearless and positive to feeling discouraged and defeated.

    "I felt devastated," the 17-year-old said.

    Moments like these made Andrew realize his passion in life: education. He believes all students should have an equal chance to use their education to get better positions later on in life, and stop a cycle of poverty.

    About the reporters
    This story was written by student journalists participating in The Oregonian's High School Journalism Institute, a collaborative effort with Oregon State University to promote diversity in newsrooms of the future.
    To see more of the students' work, visit the Teens blog.

    He was frustrated that the younger students on the other team seemed to know more calculus than his fellow seniors. To let off some steam, he wrote a story for the David Douglas Highlander newspaper to describe how he felt the school's lack of Advanced Placement courses made it harder to get as good an education as as his peers do at other schools.

    "They deserve the best that the school can give," he said.

    With his outgoing voice, Andrew knew he could use the school newspaper to show other students how they have the short end of the stick. For example, Westview High School – the team that beat them in the Science Bowl – will have 18 Advanced Placement classes in the fall. David Douglas High School has nine AP classes.

    His column explained how the school board should add more AP classes, such as AP Economics.

    After reading Andrew's column, many students came up to him and said they agreed with him. He and others eventually started a petition, which 500 students signed, to tell the school board about their frustrations on April 10.

    The school board gave Andrew and a friend good feedback, and eventually promised to consider adding the economics course.

    Andrew learned the value of a good education from his parents, who emigrated from Vietnam before he was born. His father, a grocery store worker, and his mother, a cook at Portland Public Schools, told him they couldn't do the jobs they wanted because they didn't go to college.

    The pair were constantly working to support Andrew. As an only child, he sometimes felt lonely but kept himself busy.

    At school, he was the president of the Science Club, an editor of the school newspaper and a member of the National Honors Society.

    He also teamed up with Peter Freedman, a local game enthusiast, to start a club at his school for Go, a game that started in ancient China. Andrew even won a championship in a beginner's division for North America in his age group.

    Eventually, Andrew wants to attend Pomona College in Claremont, California. He likes the school because it's a small, liberal arts college where he'll be able to develop close relationships with his professors.

    He wants to become a professor because he feels education and information are "necessary to advance the community."

    "Education shouldn't be a luxury," he said. "It's a necessity."

    --Nardous Bahru, Parkrose High School

  • Portland teams with Metro to update region's aerial map, image database as part of $864,000 project

    Portland is partnering with more than two dozen other cities and public agencies to gather a uniform and up-to-date aerial map and image database for the metro region.

    Portland is partnering with more than two dozen other cities and public agencies to gather a uniform and up-to-date aerial map and image database for the metro region.

    The data have wide implications for city planners and are used to help map landslide risk areas, track the amount of vacant land in the city, provide 3D modeling for buildings and identify earthquake faults. Portland hasn't performed an aerial survey since 2007.

    The regional partners, led by Metro and Portland, are contracting with Oregon's Department of Geology and Mineral Industries to gather the aerial photos and data. DOGAMI uses Quantum Spatial, a geo-mapping company with a Portland office, to gather the data.

    The company uses LiDAR, which stands for light detection and ranging, to collect precise aerial data points. LiDAR collects data by firing infrared laser light pulses in rapid succession from a low-flying airplane. The light bounces back to a sensor on the airplane, tracking the highest and lowest hit objects. The technology allows for extremely precise maps and data sets. LiDAR can penetrate through trees and vegetation to the ground.

    Portland was one of the first cities in the nation to use LiDAR a decade ago. But according to city documents, Portland's current LiDAR data sets are from three non-overlapping flights spread across various years. The data are "of varying quality and therefore varying utility," city documents said.

    PDC bare earth LiDARThe same image from above, but this one shows the bare ground readings from Portland International Airport. 

    "The updated data will both capture current development conditions, which have changed substantially since 2004, and provide much higher quality information," city planners wrote.

    On Wednesday, the Portland City Council approved the city's $280,000 share of the project, which costs $864,000 overall. The group of public agencies pools its resources to pay for the data collection, and then each partner has access to the entire data set.

    DOGAMI officials said the project is one of its largest and a top priority for the agency.

    For the past 40 years, the city's transportation bureau tracked Portland's landslides, recording 1,300 since that time. On average, there are roughly 34 landslides per year. New landslide maps would help city bureaus plan new construction projects, coordinate responses to emergencies, issue permits on private development and mitigate natural hazards.

    Portland Mayor Charlie Hales earmarked money for the LiDAR project in his Innovation Fund Challenge, the $1 million incentive pitched to city bureaus late last year to inspire creativity in government.

    Hales awarded the Bureau of Planning and Sustainability $90,000 for its share of the LiDAR project through the innovation challenge. The Water Bureau is chipping in $105,000 and the Bureau of Environmental Services will contribute $50,000 while the Bureau of Technology Services pays $35,000. Water officials said the LiDAR map of the Bull Run Watershed helps the bureau map for landslide risks.

    Aerial mapping and photo gathering is already underway. The data will become available to the public in roughly a year, according to Metro officials.

    DOGAMI has an online map of older data that is available to the public.

    Here's a map of where DOGAMI's contractor will perform its LiDAR surveying.

    The Regional Photo Consortium includes Washington, Clackamas and Multnomah counties, TriMet, the Port of Portland, Hillsboro and other cities. Here's a full list:

     

    Metro
    City of Portland
    City of Tigard
    City of Hillsboro
    Tualatin Valley Fire and Rescue
    City of Beaverton
    City of Tualatin
    City of Lake Oswego
    Washington County
    City of Forest Grove
    City of Cornelius
    Clean Water Services
    Multnomah County
    Clackamas County
    TriMet
    Port of Portland
    City of Gresham
    City of Oregon City
    Tualatin Valley Water District
    City of West Linn
    City of Wilsonville
    City of Milwaukie
    City of Troutdale
    City of Sherwood
    Oak Lodge Sanitary District
    Oak Lodge Water District
    City of Damascus
    City of Fairview
    The U.S. Geological Survey
    The Oregon Department of Administrative Services
    The Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries
    -- Andrew Theen
  • PGE recalls 70,000 residential meters because of flaws, rare fire risk

    Portland General Electric is recalling 70,000 residential meters because some are not performing up to standards and, in rare cases, catching fire.

    Update: Many of the recalled meters are installed at rental properties in East Multnomah County, and three small meter fires have been reported in PGE's service territory.

    SALEM — Portland General Electric is recalling 70,000 residential meters because some are not performing up to standards and, in rare cases, catching fire.

    The Statesman Journal reports the meters are primarily installed at rental properties between 2010 and 2012 and contain a specific technology that allows the meter to be turned on and off remotely.

    The meters aren't concentrated to a specific area and include clusters in East Multnomah County and parts of Marion County.

    The company says customers whose meters are affected have been mailed letters that were sent Wednesday. In the meantime, customers can check whether their meters are affected online using an eight-digit number that can be found on the meters or on your monthly electricity bill.

    — With additional reporting by Susannah L. Bodman, sbodman@oregonian.com

  • Happening this weekend: Pet-related events you can attend

    Friday The Oregon Cat benefit yard sale: Housewares, furniture, books, clothing and more will be available at this two-day yard sale, 9:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday at 343 B Ave., Lake Oswego. All proceeds will benefit The Oregon Cat. Details: TheOregonCat.Org. Volunteer orientation at MCAS: Learn how to help pets at Multnomah County Animal Services at this volunteer...

    Friday

    The Oregon Cat benefit yard sale: Housewares, furniture, books, clothing and more will be available at this two-day yard sale, 9:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday at 343 B Ave., Lake Oswego. All proceeds will benefit The Oregon Cat. Details: TheOregonCat.Org.

    Volunteer orientation at MCAS: Learn how to help pets at Multnomah County Animal Services at this volunteer orientation, 7-8 p.m. Friday at the shelter, 1700 W. Columbia River Highway in Troutdale. Participants will learn volunteer opportunities and requirements. No RSVP necessary; details at multcopets.org.

    Saturday

    Fences for Fido rummage sale: This third-annual, name-your-price rummage sale benefiting Fences for Fido will take place from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at 2012 S.E. Taggert St. in Portland. Baked goods and Fences for Fido gear will also be on sale. Details: FencesforFido.org.

    Odds 'N Ends for Furry Friends Garage Sale: This sale benefiting Animal Aid, a nonprofit shelter based in Southwest Portland, will take place 9 a.m.-4 p.m. in the parking lot of Southwest Southwest Autobody and Frame, 4200 S.W. Beaverton-Hillsdale Highway, Portland. Details: animalaidpdx.org.

    Mud Bay Shop & Adopt event: Shop for pet supplies, test out dog treat samples or meet adoptable animals from Oregon Humane Society at this event, noon-3 p.m. at Mud Bay, 1616 N.W. Glisan St., Portland. Details: oregonhumane.org.

    Kitten adoptions: Kittens from Cat Adoption Team will be available for adoption and volunteers will be on hand to answer questions, noon-4 p.m. at Cedar Hills Crossing, 3205 S.W. Cedar Hills Blvd. in Beaverton. Details: catadoptionteam.org.

    Dog Days of Summer at the Hotel Modera: A party celebrating the downtown hotel's new pet-friendly policy this month will take place from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. at the hotel, 515 S.W. Clay St., Portland. The event will include light fare, pet-friendly treats provided by local vendors and adoptable dogs from OHS. Details: oregonhumane.org.

    Puppy Romp: Puppies will learn how to play and socialize with other dogs in an appropriate way and OHS trainers will be on hand to answer any questions about raising puppies at this class, 5-5:45 p.m. in Manners Halls at the Animal Medical and Learning Center at Oregon Humane Society, 1067 N.E. Columbia Blvd. in Portland. Puppies must be five months or younger, current on vaccinations and show no signs of illness. Cost: $5 suggested donation; details at oregonhumane.org.

    Sunday

    Pongo Fund Pet Food Bank: Pet food will be distributed to struggling pet owners from 10 a.m. -1:30pm at The Pongo Fund's Southeast Portland location. Please call for important details before arriving: 503-939-7555or visit thepongofund.org.

    Dog adoption outreach: Meet adoptable dogs from Multnomah County Animal Services, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. at Mud Bay's Lake Oswego location, 3 Monroe Parkway in Lake Oswego. Details: multcopets.org.

    Sassy's Car & Dog Wash: This car and dog wash benefiting the Oregon Humane Society will take place noon to 6 p.m. at Sassy's, 927 S.E. Morrison St., Portland. All proceeds will benefit OHS. Details: oregonhumane.org

    --Monique Balas; msbalaspets@gmail.com

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