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  • Oregon City's second half effort on defense sends Pioneers to 54-16 win over Centennial: Recap

    After an exciting first half, Oregon City (5-3, 5-1 Mt. Hood) ramped up their defensive effort and shut Centennial (3-5, 2-4) out in the second half to get the 54-16 win on their home field.

    After an exciting first half, Oregon City (5-3, 5-1 Mt. Hood) ramped up their defensive effort and shut Centennial (3-5, 2-4) out in the second half to get the 54-16 win on their home field.

    On the first play of the game, Dezmond Stoudamire returned the opening kickoff for 90 yards to put the Eagles on the board first. After Centennial kicked to Oregon City, the Pioneers busted out the ole hook-and-ladder play. Quarterback Thomas Hamilton passed to Hunter Knighton for 10 yards. Knighton then pitched the ball to Trevon Bradford who took it 60 yards to the endzone.

    The craziness continued in the first when Oregon City blocked a field goal and Bradford returned it 81 yards for a touchdown.

    The second quarter included a field goal for each team and a safety for Oregon City to bring the score to 26-16 Pioneers.

    Hamilton added three touchdown passes in the second half to put Centennial away for good.

    Oregon City will travel to Barlow and Centennial hosts Gresham next week.

  • Reynolds spoils monsterous rushing day from Barlow's Speedy Sanchez; Raiders win 36-35: Recap

    Speedy Sanchez ran 24 times for 296 yards and four touchdowns.

    Speedy Sanchez nearly carried Barlow (4-4, 2-4 Mt. Hood Conference) to a victory, but a two-point conversion late in the fourth quarter gave the Reynolds Raiders (3-5, 2-4) a 36-35 win on Friday night in Troutdale. 

    Sanchez rushed 24 times for 296 yards and four touchdowns, but was contained on the Bruins' final drive in the fourth.

    Reynolds played three different quarterbacks on the night, starting with Jesus Ortiz and finishing with Nick McCoy, who hooked up with Kanyon Flynn for the go-ahead two-point conversion.

    Reynolds' Ja'Ryll Johnson rushed 20 times for 147 yards and two touchdowns.

    -- Erik C. Anderson

  • Friday evening commute: Early weekend off to slow start

    Things are already looking pretty congested out there. Check back in for updates.

    PORTLAND, 6:53 p.m.: Rose Quarter

    Things starting to clear up a little across the area with the exception around the Rose Quarter due to the Boo Bomb concert and Disney on Ice

    ***

    PORTLAND, 6:00 p.m.: Portland/Metro area

    No major crashes to report, but things are still very, very slow pretty much everywhere. Interstate 5 is clogged from Wilsonville to Vancouver in both directions, although things open up Southbound from downtown for a bit. Interstate 205 isn't any better from Clackamas to Vancouver and headed north into Oregon City. Highway 26 and 217 are both moving slow around Beaverton and Tigard. At least it isn't pouring down rain, right?

    ***

    PORTLAND, 4:34 p.m.: Barber Boulevard and Capital Highway

    There is a crash on Barber Boulevard Northbound at Capitol Highway that is blocking the right lane. Could affect those looking to move around the Interstate 5 madness.

    ***

    Things are already looking pretty congested out there (hence the tardiness of this post). Check back in for updates.

    Follow the Oregonian's commuting alerts on Twitter: @TrafficPortland

    -- Ryan Fernandez

  • Marysville school shooting: 'Stay strong,' seek help, Reynolds students say

    Students who went through a deadly shooting at Reynold High School offer words of advice Friday. Watch video

    Some students at Reynolds High School offered words of support Friday after learning about a deadly school shooting in Marysville, Wash.

    "Stay strong," said sophomore Rachel Brighouse, 15.

    Brighouse was in Reynolds' main school building on June 10 when a classmate shot and killed freshman Emilio Hoffman in the gym locker room.

    Brighouse, like many students, has tried to move beyond that day. But incidents such as Friday's shooting at Marysville-Pilchuck High School bring memories back.

    Washington authorities say a gunman opened fire in the Marysville cafeteria. Two students, including the gunman, died. Four others were wounded.

    "We know exactly what they're going through," Brighouse said.

    Several Reynolds students said they learned about the Marysville shooting from Reynolds teachers. Others said the news never made it into their classrooms.

    Junior Jose Huerta, 16, said he heard about today's shooting at about 2:30 p.m. when his U.S. history teacher told students.

    The news brought Huerta back to last year's tragic day at Reynolds. Huerta said he still doesn't like going to the gym and chose to skip an assembly Friday.

    "I don't want to go to the gym because of what happened last year," he said.

    Huerta recommended that Marysville students traumatized by the shooting seek help from counselors and talk about their feelings.

    Reynolds Superintendent Linda Florence posted a message on the school's website Friday about the Washington shooting. She said that students' responses to tragic news will vary.

    "Some children may experience a rush of feelings right away, while others may be in a state of disbelief for a while and may just appear dazed and confused," she wrote. "Some may initially be angry or fearful, while others may be so uncomfortable with their feelings that they act silly or giggly, even though they are hurting inside. All of these reactions are normal ways of dealing with grief."

    Freshman Sou Saeteurn, 14, wasn't yet a student at Reynolds when last year's shooting occurred.

    Until Friday, Saeteurn said he hadn't heard student or teachers discuss Reynold's shooting very often.

    "I guess people don't want to talk about it," he said, "because it brings back bad memories."

    -- Brad Schmidt

  • Friday Night Spotlight: Oregon high school football Week 8 scoreboard and more (live chat recap)

    Follow along for live updates and scores from Week 8 of Oregon high school football games kicking off around the state including your own updates in the comments section.

    (LIVE updates appear in the comments section below)

    Week 8 of the Oregon high school football season is winding down and The Oregonian is here to bring you a complete recap from all reported Oregon high school football games played across the state.

    If you couldn't make the live chat this week, fear not. We have a complete roundup of every game played this week including final scores, game recaps, photos, video highlights and more. Using the links provided below, find your team's score and more from another wild week in Oregon high school football:

     

    Final scores: Class 6A | Class 5A | Class 4A | Class 3A | Class 2A | Class 1A


    Game-specific live updates for Week 8:

    • Game of the Week: Liberty 21, Wilsonville 14

    Tigard 45, Lakeridge 35

    Central Catholic 33, Clackamas 7

    Jesuit 48, Southridge 24

    Westview 45, Sunset 14

    Century 41, Aloha 34

    Grant 20, Roosevelt 18

    Gladstone 70, Molalla 21


    More stories, photos and videos from Friday night's action

  • Portland's Bull Run reservoirs added 1.8 billion gallons of rainfall in 2 days this week

    Heavy and steady rain in the Portland metro area contributed 1.8 billion gallons of rainfall to Portland's two reservoirs at the Bull Run Watershed northeast of Sandy.

    What a difference a few days can make.

    Heavy and steady rain in the Portland metro area contributed 1.8 billion gallons of rainfall to Portland's two reservoirs at the Bull Run Watershed northeast of Sandy.

    According to Portland Water Bureau officials, the deluge came between Wednesday and Friday.

    The bountiful rain came as the bureau was nearing the end of its "drawdown," the period of time during the summer and early fall where more water is leaving the reservoirs than entering the bodies of water.

    During drawdown, water levels are so low at the watershed's two reservoirs that old stumps from trees chopped down to create the reservoirs stick out in a sporadic pattern.

    Bull Run Watershed is the source of drinking water for nearly 1 million Oregonians.

    One rainfall measurement, at the city's headworks facility where the water is first treated with chlorine to kill bacteria and organisms, city officials recorded 2.8 inches of new precipitation. Deeper in the Bull Run Watershed Management Unit, the name for the nearly 200 square mile protected territory, the city measured 6.3 inches of new rainfall.

    For perspective: Reservoir 1's capacity is 10 billion gallons of water, while Reservoir 2 holds up to 7 billion gallons. Officials said the actual system capacity at Bull Run is closer to 13.5 billion gallons.

    — Andrew Theen
  • Van associated with Gresham homicide suspect found in Forest Grove, police say

    About an hour after Teddy Stivahtis Jr. was arrested Thursday, Forest Grove police were notified of a suspicious van in the city, the department said.

    Teddy Stivahtis.jpgTeddy Stivahtis Jr. 

    A van associated with Teddy Stivahtis Jr., the suspect in a Gresham killing and Lake Oswego and Canby bank robberies, was seized in Forest Grove Thursday, according to authorities.

    Portland police officers arrested Stivahtis about 3:45 p.m. Thursday after contacting him at Burlingame Fred Meyer on Southwest Barbur Boulevard.

    Stivahtis is suspected of stabbing his 70-year-old aunt, Deanna Stivahtis, who was found dead on Oct. 11, Gresham police said. He was seen driving his aunt's dark green van away from her mobile home at Bellacres Mobile Estates off Southeast Division Street before her body was discovered.

    About an hour after Stivahtis' arrest Thursday, police were notified of a suspicious van in the 1700 block of 21st Avenue in Forest Grove, said Capt. Mike Herb, a police department spokesman.

    A resident had flagged down an officer about 4:45 p.m. to report the van in another part of town, Herb said. The vehicle, the resident told police, had been there for a couple days, and one of its windows was rolled down, despite the rain. It didn't look right, the resident reported.

    The officer responded to check on the van, ran its plate and discovered the connection with Stivahtis, Herb said. No one was inside the vehicle, and police don't know whether Stivahtis knows anyone in the area.

    Forest Grove police notified Gresham investigators, who responded and seized the vehicle.

    "It's kind of a reminder to folks," Herb said. "Call us when you see these weird things."

    Gresham police confirmed that Stivahtis was the suspect in his aunt's killing on Oct. 14.

    The day before, Stivahtis was caught on video surveillance passing a demand note to a teller at the Chase Bank branch at a Canby Fred Meyer, authorities said. He ran off with an undisclosed amount of cash, according to police.

    Lake Oswego police also identified Stivahtis as a suspect in an Oct. 18 bank robbery at a Key Bank. Police said Stivahtis used a note to obtain cash, then fled.

    On Tuesday a federal grand jury returned a two-count indictment against Stivahtis, accusing him of stealing $6,419 from the Canby bank and $1,356 from the Lake Oswego one. 

    -- Rebecca Woolington and Kasia Hall 

  • Marysville school shooting: Reynolds High School prepares grief counselors 4 months after its own tragedy

    News of another school shooting in the Pacific Northwest has Reynolds High School preparing for grief counselors.

    Reynolds School District officials are gearing up to provide emotional support to Reynolds High School students and staff after the news of a school shooting north of Seattle on Friday.

    The tragedy in Marysville, Wash., comes just four months after a shooting rocked Reynolds.

    Superintendent Linda Florence, posted a statement and list of resources on the district's website.

    "We are sorry to learn of today's tragic news of a school shooting at Marysville Pilchuck High School," Florence wrote.

    On June 10, Reynolds freshman Emilio Hoffman was killed by a fellow classmate, who then turned the gun on himself.

    "It can be difficult to accept the unexpected loss of a young person," Florence said in the statement. "Each individual handles tragic news differently.  Some children may experience a rush of feelings right away, while others may be in a state of disbelief for a while and may just appear dazed and confused. Some may initially be angry or fearful, while others may be so uncomfortable with their feelings that they act silly or giggly, even though they are hurting inside. All of these reactions are normal ways of dealing with grief. Please recognize that your child may need to spend some time in one or more of these emotional states, while they work through these different feelings."

    Florence's message includes contact information for Multnomah County crisis lines for both students and staff.

    Andrea Watson, the district's spokeswoman, said news of the fatal shooting in Washington state hadn't started to bubble up throughout the district as of the noon hour on Friday, but she expected more students and staff would become aware during the afternoon.

    "This could be a place where people pause and relive what happened here," Watson said.

    This is homecoming week at Reynolds, Watson said, with the homecoming football game this evening and the school's dance tomorrow.

    "Unless it bubbles up and people become aware of it, we should keep the day as normal as possible," Watson said.

    Watson said it's a little disappointing to hear the news of the school shooting Friday given that homecoming week is an important time for the Reynolds community to bond together. "We've never done this before," she said of coping with the pain of the events of June 10.

    High school officials made no formal announcement Friday of the shooting, Watson said, and had no plans to. After school, the district plans to connect with staff and students to make sure they know of resources available to them.

    — Andrew Theen

  • Oregon high school football live audio, video for Week 8: links

    If you can't make it out to the field for your team's game, you might still be able to catch the action on the radio or one of the online live audio or video streams available here.

    Week 8 of the Oregon high school football season kicks off on Friday. If you can't make it out to the field for your team's game, you might still be able to catch the action on the radio or one of the online live audio or video streams available here.

    To add your station or broadcast to this list, please contact eanderson@oregonian.com. If your game isn't being broadcast online this week, don't forget that you can also follow along or join us by posting score updates from your team's game in our Friday Night Spotlight live chat, which kicks off tomorrow afternoon and can be found on the high school sports home and football pages.

    (Also, check out our best high school helmets in Oregon gallery above.)

    If you can't find your score listed in the comments section of the live chat, be sure to check the links below to find this week's scoreboards for each classification:


    Here are the games available for live streaming on Friday for Week 8:

    Thursday and Friday Night Spotlight - 2014 High School Football

    October 24, 2014
    Football Audio
    • McNary vs. South Salem - 7 p.m. 
    Audio from KBZY 1490 AM
    Listen live 
    • Crane Union vs. Adrian - 7 p.m.
    Video from NFHS
    Watch live  
    • Pine Eagle vs. Echo - 7 p.m.
    Video from NFHS
    Watch live  
    • Sherwood vs. Canby - 7 p.m.
    Video from NFHS
    Watch live  
    • West Salem vs. West Albany- 7 p.m.
    Audio from from KSHO AM 920 
    Listen live  
    • Lake Oswego vs. Newberg - 7 p.m. 
    Audio from from KLYC AM 1260 
    Listen live  
    • Canby vs. Newberg - 7 p.m. 
    Audio from from KLYC AM 1260 
    Listen live  
    • Dallas vs. Lebanon  - 7 p.m. 
    Audio from KGAL AM 1580
    Listen live  
    • Aloha vs. Century - 7 p.m.
    Webcast from 1360 AM KUIK
    Listen live  
    • Roseburg vs. Thurston - 7 p.m.
    Audio from 541 Radio
    Listen live  
    • Sutherlin vs. Junction City- 7 p.m.
    Audio from 541 Radio
    Listen live 
    • North Medford vs. South Medford - 7 p.m.
    Video from Tablerock Sports
    Watch live  
    • South Eugene vs. Grants Pass - 7 p.m.
    Video from Tablerock Sports
    Watch live  
    • Churchill vs. Eagle Point - 7 p.m.
    Video from Tablerock Sports
    Watch live  
    • Crater vs. Springfield - 7 p.m.
    Video from Tablerock Sports
    Watch live  
    • Hood River Valley vs. Hermiston- 7 p.m.
    Audio from from KIHR
    Listen live  
    • South Umpqua vs. Douglas - 7 p.m.
    Audio from Douglas County Sports Online
    Listen live  
    • Marshfield vs. North Bend - 7 p.m.
    Audio from 98.7 K LIGHT
    Listen live  
    • Klamath Union vs Henley - 7 p.m.
    Audio from ESPN 93.3 and 960 AM
    Listen live  
    To add your station or broadcast to this list, please contact eanderson@oregonian.com. If your game isn't being broadcast online this week, don't forget that you can also follow along or join us by posting score updates from your team's game in our Friday Night Spotlight live chat, which kicks off tomorrow afternoon and can be found on the high school sports home and football pages.
  • In Fairview, business group's preferred candidates battle rivals for 5 positions in city government

    The races reflect a singular divide, pitting a slate of candidates backed by the Fairview Business Association and a host of opponents largely united against them for the unpaid city leadership positions.

    Every race for Fairview city government on the Nov. 4 ballot is contested, and hotly so.

    Beyond the rhetorical battles, interviews with nearly all of the 11 candidates vying for four council seats and the mayor's office revealed general agreement on which issues matter most:

    • encouraging economic development to increase city tax revenues;
    • guiding consistent redevelopment of Fairview's stretch of Northeast Halsey Street in conjunction with Wood Village and Troutdale; and

    But the races also reflect a singular divide, pitting a slate of candidates backed by the Fairview Business Association and a host of opponents largely united against them for the city leadership positions.

    Conversations with candidates in both camps quickly lead to accusations that the other side is involved in deceptive and negative campaigns, or is hiding special interests, or is the true polarizing force behind the council in recent years.

    Jabs thrown

    Fairview council races
    See all the candidates running for Fairview City Council in The Oregonian's Voters Guide.

    Typical of such skirmishes was candidate Brian Cooper's criticism of incumbent Tamie Arnold, who's supported by the business association, for her use of uniformed Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts in campaign work and images.

    The race between Arnold and Cooper reprises a 2012 matchup between Cooper and Arnold. Cooper had been appointed to the council earlier that year to temporarily fill a seat vacated by his father, Larry Cooper, who died in office. Arnold, who lost an election to the elder Cooper two years earlier, unseated the son narrowly.

    Ed Bejarana, administrator of the Fairview Business Association's Facebook page, recently launched a Facebook attack on mayoral candidate Lisa Barton Mullins.

    Bejerana placed the candidate's photograph alongside a picture of Mr. Burns, Homer Simpson's boss in Matt Groening's enduring television cartoon series.

    Bejarana, who lost a past city council race to Barton Mullins, said the comparison with a comically loathed nuclear power plant executive was appropriate. He noted that none of Barton Mullins' fellow council members endorsed her.

    "I just have the basic belief that all is fair in love and politics," said Bejarana. "Nothing here is personal."

    Barton Mullins, the who has been endorsed by a number of regional politicians, responded, "I have basically just been ignoring all the negative stuff."

    3-way mayor's race

    Barton Mullins' rivals for mayor are Ted Tosterud, a council member appointed last winter, and Curtis K. Burnett, a realtor and political newcomer.

    Tosterud promises to remain neutral but has the Fairview Business Association's endorsement.

    The association has strongly promoted Tosterud's experience in upper- management for a large medical diagnostics firm. But the affiliation also has come with some cost for Tosterud.

    The Outlook newspaper endorsed Barton Mullins, citing Tosterud's backing by the business association as a negative.

    Bejarana, on the business association's Facebook page, lashed back at that newspaper's endorsement and followed it up with a string of attacks on candidates opposing the business association's slate.

    Tosterud said he wants to get the council working together with better communication and clearly is uncomfortable with the negativity from all sides.

    "What they do is their business. What I do is my business," he said. "I am trying to stay neutral all the way down the street here."

    Meanwhile, candidate Burnett hopes his status as the relative unknown in the mayor's race actually plays to his advantage.

    "I've just heard from a lot of citizens that there was a lot of discord on the council and with the mayor," he said. "I'm just not getting involved in that nonsense."

    Weatherby's takeaway

    Endorsements by retiring mayor Mike Weatherby show that some of the lines separating factions on the council have the potential of blurring.

    While Weatherby maintains a long-held concern that some Fairview Business Association members hope to wield improper influence over the council, he has sided with the group's endorsements for Tosterud, Arnold and Leslie N. Moore. But Weatherby also broke with the business group in endorsing Steve Owen and Keith Kudrna for the council.

    Weatherby said he hopes his preffered candidates will "be independent, do what they want."

    -- Eric Apalategui
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