Gresham In The News

  • OregonLive - News

  • Portland forecast: High temperatures, plenty of sun and a slight breeze

    You can expect plenty of sun and a slight breeze throughout the day and winds of about 5 mph tonight, forecasters say.

    Sunday won't offer any relief from the heat, with temperatures rising into the low-to-mid 90s this afternoon.

    A heat advisory is in place through midnight Wednesday, forecasters say, and Sunday's high will be 94 degrees with an overnight low of 63.

    You can expect plenty of sun and a slight breeze throughout the day and winds of about 5 mph tonight, forecasters say.

    Temperatures are predicted to stay in the 90s for much of the week, with highs at 90 degrees or more through Wednesday before dipping into the 80s and high 70s through Saturday.

    Looking for ways to beat the heat? The Oregonian/OregonLive's Stuart Tomlinson compiled this list of 10 ways to stay cool late last month. It may be worth revisiting today.

    -- Jim Ryan

    jryan@oregonian.com

    503-221-8005

    @Jimryan015

  • Private timber companies close lands in Columbia River Gorge

    Nine private timber companies have closed access to their land in the Columbia Gorge due to extreme fire danger. The Columbian newspaper reports the land totals 300,000 acres in Skamania and Klickitat counties in Washington and Hood River and Wasco counties in Oregon. The companies say they will keep the land closed until significant moisture reduces fire hazards. The nine...

    Nine private timber companies have closed access to their land in the Columbia Gorge due to extreme fire danger.

    The Columbian newspaper reports the land totals 300,000 acres in Skamania and Klickitat counties in Washington and Hood River and Wasco counties in Oregon.

    The companies say they will keep the land closed until significant moisture reduces fire hazards.

    The nine companies are American Forest Management, Broughton Lumber Co., Hancock Forest Management, Kreps Ranch LLC, Stevenson Land Co., Western Pacific Timberlands, Weyerhaeuser Columbia Timberlands, Kreps Ranch and PK Kreps Family LLC.

    -- The Associated Press

  • Portland forecast: High temperatures, favorable evening conditions for the Fourth

    Temperatures are expected to rise to a high of 90 degrees before cooling off to a low of 64 degrees tonight.

    Expect sunny skies and hot temperatures for the Fourth, folks. 

    A heat advisory is in place until Sunday evening, and forecasters don't expect much change in the current weather pattern heading through the Fourth and into next week.

    Temperatures were about 62 degrees just after 7 a.m. today and are expected to rise to a high of 90 degrees before cooling off to a low of 64 degrees tonight. 

    Forecasters say conditions for watching fireworks will be good. They predict mostly clear skies and Northwest winds of five to eight mph in Portland. 

    Do you know where you're planning to watch fireworks tonight? If not, The Oregonian/OregonLive has you covered with a list of the best places to watch Fourth of July fireworks.

    And remember, if you're fan of lighting fireworks yourself: Illegal fireworks are ones that fly, explode or travel more than six feet on the ground or one foot into the air, according to a previous Oregonian/OregonLive story.

    -- Jim Ryan

    jryan@oregonian.com

    503-221-8005

    @Jimryan015

  • Thursday evening Portland-area commute: Stall on I-5 north at Interstate Bridge

    All TriMet MAX lines and the WES Commuter Rail are running slow due to the heat again today. Plan accordingly.

    ***

    PORTLAND, 7:12 p.m.: Interstate 5 north at Interstate Bridge

    The right northbound lane of I-5 is blocked by a stall at the Interstate Bridge.

    Traffic is still jammed back to Terwilliger Curves.

    ***

    PORTLAND, 6:32 p.m.: Interstate 405 north near 6th Ave.

    A rollover crash has two I-405 northbound lanes block near the 6th Avenue exit. Traffic backed up to Marquam Bridge.

    ***

    PORTLAND, 5:44 p.m.: Interstate 5 north near Capitol Highway

    The left lane of I-5 is blocked by a stall. Going to make the I-5 north jam even worse.

    ***

    PORTLAND, 5:32 p.m.: Highway 26 east at Vista Ridge Tunnel

    A stall is blocking the left eastbound lane of HWY 26 at the Vista Ridge tunnel. Interstate 405 is jammed in both directions with people trying to get through tunnel.

    ***

    PORTLAND, 5:29 p.m.: Interstate 84 east near 82nd Ave.

    The left eastbound lane of I-84 is blocked by a crash. Jammed back to I-5 from earlier congestion.

    ***

    PORTLAND, 4:27 p.m.: Interstate 5 north at Victory Blvd.

    The left northbound lane of I-5 is blocked by a crash approaching Hayden Island. I-5 is already jammed back to Highway 99 from earlier congestion.

    ***

    TUALATIN, 4:14 p.m.: The crash that closed 124th is a fatal motorcycle crash. Will remain closed for a few hours.

    ***

    Two eastbound lanes of Highway 26 are blocked at Murray Blvd. by a crash. Traffic currently backed up to 185th Ave.

    ODOT also warns of a crash on Interstate 5 north at Capitol Highway. The right lane is blocked on that one. 

    A stall is blocking a westbound lane of Highway 26 near the Oregon Zoo. Jammed back out the other side of the tunnel and out on Interstate 405 in both directions.

    Another stall is slowing southbound traffic on Interstate 5 at the Interstate Bridge.

    All TriMet MAX lines and the WES Commuter Rail are running slow due to the heat again today. Plan accordingly.

    A crash has 124th Avenue closed at Tualatin-Sherwood road.

    Follow the Oregonian's commuting alerts on Twitter: @TrafficPortland

  • Sweet Cakes: State orders Oregon bakery owners to pay $135,000 for denying service to same-sex couple

    Labor Commissioner Brad Avakian ordered the owners of Sweet Cakes by Melissa to pay a lesbian couple for emotional suffering that resulted from the denial of service. Aaron and Melissa Klein had cited their Christian beliefs against same-sex marriage in refusing to make the cake.

    The owners of a shuttered Gresham bakery must pay $135,000 in damages to a lesbian couple for refusing to make them a wedding cake, the state's top labor official said Thursday.

    State Labor Commissioner Brad Avakian ordered Aaron and Melissa Klein to pay the women for emotional and mental suffering that resulted from the denial of service. The Kleins had cited their Christian beliefs against same-sex marriage in refusing to make the cake.

    Avakian's ruling upheld a preliminary finding earlier this year that the Kleins, owners of Sweet Cakes by Melissa, had discriminated against the Portland couple on the basis of their sexual orientation.

    The case ignited a long-running skirmish in the nation's culture wars, pitting civil rights advocates against religious freedom proponents who argued business owners should have the right to refuse services for gay and lesbian weddings.

    Avakian's final order makes clear that serving potential customers equally trumps the Kleins' religious beliefs. Under Oregon law, businesses cannot discriminate or refuse service based on sexual orientation, just as they cannot turn customers away because of race, sex, disability, age or religion, the Oregon Bureau of Labor and Industries said in a news release.

    "This case is not about a wedding cake or a marriage," Avakian wrote. "It is about a business's refusal to serve someone because of their sexual orientation. Under Oregon law, that is illegal.

    "Within Oregon's public accommodations law is the basic principle of human decency that every person, regardless of their sexual orientation, has the freedom to fully participate in society.  The ability to enter public places, to shop, to dine, to move about unfettered by bigotry."

    Sweet Cakes final order
    Read the 122-page final order issued by Commissioner Brad Avakian in the case brought by the Oregon Bureau of Labor and Industries against Melissa and Aaron Klein, dba Sweet Cakes by Melissa.

    Though the Oregon Equality Act of 2007 includes an exemption for religious organizations and schools, it does not permit private business owners to deny service and discriminate against potential customers, BOLI said.

    Avakian ordered the Kleins to pay $75,000 to Rachel Bowman-Cryer and $60,000 to Laurel Bowman-Cryer. The commissioner's ruling may be appealed to the Oregon Court of Appeals.

    Anna Harmon, one of three lawyers representing the Kleins, said an appeal is likely.

    "That's up to our clients," Harmon said. "I believe at this point they are intending to preserve their constitutional rights as much as they can, and that would look like an appeal."

    The Kleins vowed to contest the ruling in a Facebook post on their Sweet Cakes by Melissa page:

    "We will NOT give up this fight, and we will NOT be silenced. We stand for God's truth, God's word and freedom for ALL americans. We are here to obey God not man, and we will not conform to this world. If we were to lose everything it would be totally worth it for our Lord who gave his one and only son, Jesus, for us! God will win this fight!"

    In a statement issued through their attorney, Paul A. Thompson, the Bowman-Cryers thanked BOLI for "sending a clear message that discrimination will simply not be tolerated in our state."

    "This has been a terrible ordeal for our entire family. We never imagined finding ourselves caught up in a fight for social justice," they said. "We endured daily, hateful attacks on social media, received death threats and feared for our family's safety, yet our goal remained steadfast. We were determined to ensure that this kind of blatant discrimination never happened to another couple, another family, another Oregonian."

    ***

    The controversy began in January 2013 when the Kleins turned away Rachel Cryer, as she was known then, and her mother from their bakery.

    In August 2013, Cryer and her partner filed a complaint with BOLI. The agency conducted an investigation and in January 2014 brought charges that the Kleins had unlawfully discriminated against the couple because of their sexual orientation.

    BOLI investigators said the Kleins' refusal violated the women's civil rights and recommended they pay $75,000 in damages to each woman for emotional suffering.

    That triggered a conciliation process between the two parties to see if a settlement could be reached. The Kleins and the state, acting on the women's behalf, could not agree, so the case went before Alan McCullough, a BOLI administrative law judge.

    During a hearing in March, both women testified to emotional stress they attributed to their experience with Sweet Cakes as well as the glare of media attention that followed.

    Rachel Bowman-Cryer also disclosed that she and Laurel felt an even greater level of stress because they were foster parents for two young girls and feared they might lose the children. The couple has since legally adopted the girls, who are now 8 and 6 years old.

    On Jan. 17, 2013, Cryer brought her mother, Cheryl McPherson, to a cake tasting appointment she had set up with Melissa Klein. That day, Melissa stayed home and Aaron went to the bakery. When he asked for the names of the bride and groom, Cryer said there would be two brides.

    "I said, 'I'm very sorry, I believe I have wasted your time. We do not do cakes for same sex weddings,' " Klein testified.

    Aaron Klein said his family, too, had suffered because of the case. Reporters came to his home and his shop, he testified during the March hearing.

    The Sweet Cakes by Melissa car was vandalized and broken into twice. Photographers and florists severed ties with the company, eventually forcing the Kleins to close their storefront shop in September 2013. The business now operates out of the couple's home in Sandy, with Melissa Klein primarily filling orders for family and friends, Harmon said.

    Following the hearing, McCullough recommended $75,000 in damages be awarded to Rachel Bowman-Cryer and $60,000 to Laurel Bowman-Cryer.

    The couple held a commitment ceremony in June 2013 and were married in May 2014, shortly after a federal judge struck down Oregon's ban on same-sex marriage.

    Though the bakery has been closed for nearly two years, the final order holds the Kleins personally liable for the debt. Harmon said she doubted the couple has the resources to pay the awarded damages.

    "I don't have any access to their checkbook, but I can tell you they are living on a garbage man's salary and they have five kids," Harmon said of her clients. This is a personal debt. The business is gone."

    At least three online attempts to help the Kleins defray their expenses were launched on the heels of McCullough's April 24 ruling.

    The first raised $109,000 on GoFundMe but the account was quickly closed after the company determined the fundraising effort violated its terms of service prohibiting campaigns that benefit individuals or groups facing formal charges or claims of serious violations of the law.

    Two faith-based nonprofits in North Carolina and Wisconsin continue to accept donations for the couple.

    -- George Rede

    grede@oregonian.com
    503-294-4004
    @georgerede

  • Sweet Cakes final order: Gresham bakery must pay $135,000 for denying service to same-sex couple

    "This case is not about a wedding cake or a marriage," Oregon Labor Commissioner Brad Avakian wrote in a final order. "It is about a business's refusal to serve someone because of their sexual orientation. Under Oregon law, that is illegal."

    UPDATED: Sweet Cakes: State orders Oregon bakery owners to pay $135,000 for denying service to same-sex couple

    Updated at 2 p.m.

    Oregon Labor Commissioner Brad Avakian on Thursday ordered the owners of a former Gresham bakery to pay $135,000 in damages to a lesbian couple for refusing to make them a wedding cake.

    Avakian's ruling upheld a preliminary finding earlier this year that the owners of Sweet Cakes by Melissa had discriminated against the women on the basis of their sexual orientation.

    Bakery owners Melissa and Aaron Klein cited their Christian beliefs against same-sex marriage in denying service. The case ignited a long-running skirmish in the nation's culture wars, pitting civil rights advocates against religious freedom proponents who argued business owners should have the right to refuse services for gay and lesbian weddings.

    Avakian's final order makes clear that serving potential customers equally trumps the Kleins' religious beliefs. Under Oregon law, businesses cannot discriminate or refuse service based on sexual orientation, just as they cannot turn customers away because of race, sex, disability, age or religion, the Oregon Bureau of Labor and Industries said in a news release.

    "This case is not about a wedding cake or a marriage," Avakian wrote. "It is about a business's refusal to serve someone because of their sexual orientation. Under Oregon law, that is illegal.

    "Within Oregon's public accommodations law is the basic principle of human decency that every person, regardless of their sexual orientation, has the freedom to fully participate in society.  The ability to enter public places, to shop, to dine, to move about unfettered by bigotry."

    Though the Oregon Equality Act of 2007 includes an exemption for religious organizations and schools, it does not permit private business owners to deny service and discriminate against potential customers, BOLI said.

    The commissioner ordered the Kleins to pay $75,000 to Rachel Bowman-Cryer and $60,000 to Laurel Bowman-Cryer. His ruling may be appealed to the Oregon Court of Appeals.

    Anna Harmon, one of three lawyers representing the Kleins, said Thursday an appeal is likely.

    "That's up to our clients," Harmon said. "I believe at this point they are intending to preserve their constitutional rights as much as they can, and that would look like an appeal."

    In a statement issued through their attorney, Paul A. Thompson, the Bowman-Cryers thanked BOLI for "sending a clear message that discrimination will simply not be tolerated in our state."

    "This has been a terrible ordeal for our entire family. We never imagined finding ourselves caught up in a fight for social justice," they said. "We endured daily, hateful attacks on social media, received death threats and feared for our family's safety, yet our goal remained steadfast. We were determined to ensure that this kind of blatant discrimination never happened to another couple, another family, another Oregonian." 

    The controversy began in January 2013 when the Kleins turned away Rachel Cryer, as she was known then, and her mother from their bakery.

    In August 2013, Cryer and her partner complained to the state Bureau of Labor and Industries. The agency conducted an investigation and in January 2014 brought charges that the Kleins had unlawfully discriminated against the couple because of their sexual orientation.

    BOLI investigators said the Kleins' refusal violated the women's civil rights and recommended they pay $75,000 in damages to each woman for emotional suffering.

    That triggered a conciliation process between the two parties to see if a settlement could be reached. The Kleins and the state, acting on the women's behalf, could not agree, so the case went before Alan McCullough, a BOLI administrative law judge.

    During a hearing in March, both women testified to the emotional stress they attributed to their experience with Sweet Cakes as well as the glare of media attention that followed.

    On Jan. 17, 2013, Cryer brought her mother, Cheryl McPherson, to a cake tasting appointment she had set up with Melissa Klein. That day, Melissa stayed home with the couple's twin 8-month-old-boys and Aaron went to the bakery. When he asked for the names of the bride and groom, Cryer said there would be two brides.

    "I said, 'I'm very sorry, I believe I have wasted your time. We do not do cakes for same sex weddings,' " Klein testified.

    Aaron Klein said his family, too, had suffered because of the case. Reporters came to his home and his shop, he testified during the March hearing.

    The Sweet Cakes by Melissa car was vandalized and broken into twice. Photographers and florists severed ties with the company, eventually forcing Sweet Cakes to close the Gresham shop in September 2013. The business now operates out of the couple's home in Sandy.

    Following the hearing, McCullough recommended $75,000 in damages be awarded to Rachel Bowman-Cryer and $60,000 to Laurel Bowman-Cryer.

    This post will be updated.

    -- George Rede

    grede@oregonian.com
    503-294-4004
    @georgerede

  • Troutdale man stabbed during fight over woman is arrested

    "The ex-boyfriend began hitting the vehicle with a skateboard," he said. "He then tried to get in the car as it was moving."

    1343277.jpegBarrera 

    A dispute between a Troutdale woman's boyfriend and her ex-boyfriend led to one of the men being stabbed Thursday morning during a scuffle inside a car, police said.

    Ultimately, Multnomah County sheriff's investigators arrested the man who was stabbed at least twice. "He instigated the confrontation," said sheriff's Sgt. Steve Dangler.    

    The fight started about 1 a.m. near Southwest 29th Street and Sundial Avenue, where 19-year-old Anthony Barrera saw his ex-girlfriend in the passenger seat of a car driven by her current boyfriend, Dangler said.

    "The ex-boyfriend began hitting the vehicle with a skateboard," he said. "He then tried to get in the car as it was moving."

    Dangler said the man behind the wheel drove a short distance and Barrerra was able to somehow get in the vehicle to start strangling the driver from behind. "In the midst of the fight, the driver stabbed the ex-boyfriend," he said.

    Deputies found Barrera at the scene with non-life threatening stab wounds. The boyfriend, who initially ran away, returned and cooperated with investigators, Dangler said.

    Police found the knife used in the stabbing nearby and towed the vehicle. Both men were taken to a local hospital for treatment.

    Barrera was later booked into Multnomah County jail on suspicion of assault, criminal mischief, disorderly conduct and strangulation.

    The woman and the man driving the vehicle were not identified.  

     -- Joseph Rose

    503-221-8029
    jrose@oregonian.com
    @josephjrose

  • Man, 79, claims Reynolds School District won't hire him because he's 'too old,' files $230,000 suit

    James Tardy Jr., 79, contends in his lawsuit that he's applied 17 times for custodian jobs in the Reynolds School District, but he's been rejected each time because of his age and race.

    A 79-year-old African-American man who says he has applied 17 times for full-time custodian jobs in the Reynolds School District -- but has been rebuffed each time, he says, because of his age or race -- is suing the district for $230,000.

    James Tardy Jr. contends that he's completely capable of the duties required of a school custodian, but each time he has applied since 2012, the district has refused to hire him, according to his lawsuit filed Wednesday in Multnomah County Circuit Court.

    "These positions have been filled by non-African-Americans and/or by individuals who are younger and less experienced than Mr. Tardy," the suit states.

    Officials from the district couldn't be reached for immediate comment for this story. The district has an enrollment of more than 11,000 students.

    Tardy started working as a part-time, substitute custodian for the district in 2007, when he was in his early 70s, his suit states. The suit contends that all of the district's other custodians -- substitute or full-time -- are younger than 70.

    "Mr. Tardy has been subjected to age-related remarks by District employees who have told him 'you need to retire' or asked him 'why don't you retire?'" states the suit. "On September 5, 2014, one of the lead custodians who trained Mr. Tardy told him that the District would never hire him for a full-time custodian position because he is too old."

    IMG_1437.JPG.jpegJames Tardy, Jr., in an undated photo taken about 10 years ago. 

    The suit doesn't describe any instances of overt racism, but it does contend that none of the district's custodians are African American.

    Portland attorney Judy Snyder, who is representing Tardy, said he client is able-bodied and able-minded.

    "He's a real hard worker," Snyder said. "He's just one of those folks who wouldn't know what to do with himself if he retired."

    Snyder said Tardy has satisfactorily been working as a temporary custodian for years.

    "He does everything a custodian would be required to do," Snyder said. "...We are unaware of any feasible reason he'd not be qualified for a full-time position." 

    Tardy's suit claims that the district retaliated against him after he complained internally and filed a complaint with the Oregon Bureau of Labor and Industries.

    Tardy is seeking $30,000 in lost wages and benefits, plus $200,000 for "emotional distress, suffering and humiliation."

    -- Aimee Green

    agreen@oregonian.com

    503-294-5119

    o_aimee

  • Wednesday evening Portland-area commute: MAX Blue, Green and Red lines delayed due to signal issue

    Delays of 15 minutes expected on all TriMet trains due to heat until it cools off a bit.

    ***

    Two readers tweeted in about a fire somewhere around the Hollywood area (between 39th and 60th) that is causing severe MAX delays.

    UPDATE, 7:04 p.m.: A brush fire is causing the MAX delays near 53rd on the north side of I-84. Vehicles are also slow in that area in both directions.

    ***

    PORTLAND, 6:23 p.m.: Interstate and Rosa Parks

    A crash is blocking northbound traffic on Interstate at the intersection with Rosa Parks. 

    ***

    TriMet warns of 15-minute delays on the Red Line due to switch issue at Gateway. All MAX trains running slow due to heat.

    UPDATE, 5:34 p.m.: TriMet adds the Blue and Green lines to the delay list. All expected to be delayed by 15 minutes.

    ***

    PORTLAND, 4:17 p.m.: SE Tacoma St. east of Sellwood Bridge

    The Sellwood Bridge people sent out a tweet about some paving along Tacoma St. that might slow eastbound bridge traffic tonight. The tweet had an incorrect date, but it appears as though paving is going on between 17th and 23rd Avenues.

    Only slight slowing across the bridge now. Something to keep an eye on for later.

    ***

    The heat is causing MAX trains and the WES Commuter to slow down again today and will probably continue to cause problems throughout the weekend. Delays of 15 minutes until it cools off a bit on the MAX and 30 minutes on the WES.

    Follow the Oregonian's commuting alerts on Twitter: @TrafficPortland

  • Judge cites poor lifestyle choices in denying lower bail to driver, 19, accused of killing pedestrian

    Miranda Ashley Calvin is accused of killing pedestrian Jerrie Ann Horning, 49, during a hit-and-run driving incident on April 25, 2015, in Gresham.

    At the time that authorities say Miranda Ashley Calvin, 19, struck and killed a Gresham pedestrian -- leaving her dead on the pavement of Powell Boulevard -- Calvin had immersed herself in a high-risk lifestyle.

    Court papers say she worked as a dancer at a Gresham strip club, Cabaret II. And that she was dating a man with a criminal rap sheet that included assault and robbery.

    Police say Calvin had cocaine in her purse when they found her hiding at the Courtyard Marriott hotel near Clackamas Town Center the day after she fled the scene of the April 25, 2015, crash.

    During a court appearance Wednesday, Calvin looked meek in a baggy blue jail uniform as she very quietly whimpered and cried. Her privately retained attorney, Eric Hale, asked Multnomah County Circuit Judge Youlee You to reduce Calvin's bail from $262,500 to an amount that would allow her parents to come up with the money to get her out.

    Calvin is accused of several crimes, including first-degree manslaughter for -- "recklessly, under circumstances manifesting extreme indifference to the value of human life" -- causing the death of 49-year-old Jerrie Ann Horning, according to charging papers. If convicted, Calvin faces a mandatory 10-year prison sentence.

    Prosecutors allege that Calvin was drinking at a party before she sped along Southeast Powell Boulevard at 40 to 50 mph in a 2009 Mercedes S550. Near 179th Avenue, police say she plowed into Horning, killing her at the scene shortly before 9 p.m.

    "There was no evidence of her stopping before or after the crash," said prosecutor Nathan Vasquez.

    A concerned person called police after spotting Calvin's blood-stained Mercedes parked about a half-mile from the scene, at the Cedarville Inn on West Powell Loop, according to a probable-cause affidavit. The car had heavy damage to its front end and windshield, according to the affidavit.

    Surveillance video showed a woman matching Calvin's description running from the car into the woods near the inn.

    The next day, police received a call from the dealership that owned the Mercedes. An employee told police that Calvin was hiding out at the Clackamas Town Center area hotel. By the time police arrested her, it was too late for drug or blood alcohol content tests to be useful in her prosecution.

    "There were signs that she tried to hide evidence," Vasquez told the judge.

    Vasquez said Calvin "ditched her car," which served as an important piece of evidence in the case. Vasquez also said Calvin's iPhone had been wiped of all data, and that data might have been useful in building a case against her.

    Toni Wrenn -- whose sister Calvin is accused of killing -- said she wants Calvin to remain in jail pending trial.

    "It concerns our family -- ...we don't want anyone else to get hurt," Wrenn said of Calvin.

    Calvin's attorney, Hale, relied on a report written by a deputy who said she believed she could adequately supervise Calvin if Calvin were released from jail. Deputy Amie Banta said she's seen a change in Calvin during her roughly two months in jail.

    "She seems to be -- in that short amount of time -- really growing up," Banta told the judge.

    Hale said that his client knows "that she will have to live with this for the rest of her life. ...She is devastated by this."

    Calvin's mother and father sat a row behind their daughter. Her mother said she makes minimum wage as a caregiver, and her father said he makes $14 an hour as a truck driver delivering produce to restaurants. They said they could scrape together a small amount of money to post as bail.

    But You, the judge, told Calvin that she wouldn't reduce bail given the serious charges and other concerns that she has.

    "It's nice to hear that things appear to be moving in the right direction," the judge said. "...But your past doesn't just go away. And there are lots of concerns there (with) your lifestyle before you were arrested."

    As You spoke, Calvin's mother folded over, placing her head next to her knees as she cried. Calvin's father released a big sigh and looked down toward the floor. And Calvin, herself, began to cry even harder.

    Calvin's trial is tentatively set for later this month, but it will likely be rescheduled to later this summer.

    -- Aimee Green

    agreen@oregonian.com

    503-294-5119

    o_aimee

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